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Re: Sand spam



The gravel used is larger than sand. I can't remember the size nomenclature 
used, but I think it is #3 aquarium gravel, with pieces about 3/16" or so 
in diameter. Someone else can confirm or correct that. Non-divers will 
spawn over the gravel and the eggs will fall into the crevices, thus 
protecting them from predation. When you stir up the gravel the eggs are 
suspended in the water and sink more slowly than the gravel, so can be 
scooped up in a net, or siphoned off the surface. Or, as someone else has 
suggested, you could try using one of those wide mouth gravel vacuum 
devices, which will suck up the eggs but not the gravel, as long as you can 
collect the siphoned material.

Possibly a few eggs do get damaged. If you collect hundreds, what would the 
loss of a few matter? My experience with fine sand is that it damages most 
of the eggs.

I can only tell you that Rosario Lacorte, an infamously successful fish 
breeder, is said to swear by this technique, and I know others have used 
it. As I said, I am a peat man and have not tried it myself.

Barry

At 01:34 PM 1/2/2003 -0800, you wrote:

>This makes no sense to me. Are you sure he wasn't talking about sand? How 
>is it possible to stir up gravel without crushing many eggs in the 
>process? I have stirred up gravel before to clean it, and it takes a lot 
>of force, enough that I would be most certain eggs would get popped. And, 
>IMO, anything that is so small that material(what might this material be? 
>besides eggs that is) will sit on the surface counts as sand(IE, if eggs 
>can't fit in the cracks between the peices of gravel, it is bordering on 
>sand, and we are back at the same place). For this to work, you would have 
>to have a layer, a single layer, of gravel, nothing piled more than 1-1 
>1/2 peices of gravel high, which would just be a pain. You would always 
>have to be in the tank flattening out the gravel to cover the enitre 
>bottom, otherwise you might as well just have a bare-bottomed tank.
>  Barry Cooper <bjc3 at cornell_edu> wrote:Actually, some annuals like Nothos 
> will lay eggs in gravel, at least small
>gravel, and you can harvest the eggs. As was mentioned previously, Rosario
>LaCorte uses this method for Nothos. You take the fish out temporarily,
>stir up the gravel, then either whisk a net around in a figure 8 motion to
>catch the eggs before they sink, or siphon off the material on the surface
>of the gravel, which should include eggs. I have never tired this. I am a
>peat man!
>
>Barry
>
>At 11:09 PM 1/1/2003 -0800, you wrote:
>
> >Have you ever seen a tank with sand in it? IMHO, sand is far, far more
> >beautiful than any gravel ever will be, especially black sand(pure white
> >gets dirty too easily). I'm in the process of converting almost all my
> >tanks to sand substrates(or atleast a mixture of sand and gravel) and I
> >love the looks of all my tanks with sand. Also, if fish lays eggs in
> >gravel, you can't harvest the eggs, and they are far more likely to lay
> >eggs in sand than gravel(correct, yes?). Sand has many advantages over
> >gravel from what I've learned. It can be vaccuumed out for cleaning, food
> >sits ontop of it so the fish don't loose it in the crack, it can easily
> >fill in spaces around caves and plants, and it is much less abrasive on
> >fishes undersides. I am sure there are other advantages(disadvantages too,
> >but I believe the advantages outweigh the disadvantages), but these are
> >the main ones I have noticed.
> >
> > unclescott wrote:> With this sandblasting sand
> > still require time to settle? I need something
> >that goes right to the bottom.
> >
> >How about gravel? ;)
> >.....
> >
> >--- Steve Thomas wrote:
> > > Where can I get this sand? All the pool places
> > > around here are closed for
> > > the winter.
> >
> > > You can find it as sandblasting sand at Lowe's.
> >
> >Awww. I was going to suggest the night shift dodging junkyard dogs.
> >.................
> >
> >Obligatory straight stuff:
> >The gravel about the size of your little finger is especially useful for
> >hiding eggs if you are going to pull your breeders and let fry hatch out.
> >
> >All the best!
> >
> >Scott
> >
> >
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>
>Barry J. Cooper, Prof. Emeritus, Dept. Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University
>Adjunct faculty, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University
>Home address: 27505 Riggs Hill Rd., Sweet Home, OR 97386 (bjc3 at cornell_edu)
>
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Barry J. Cooper, Prof. Emeritus, Dept. Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University
Adjunct faculty, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University
Home address: 27505 Riggs Hill Rd., Sweet Home, OR 97386 (bjc3 at cornell_edu)


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