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Re: Fungus on eggs




 I only mentioned dye because all Jungle brand products turn the water one color or another, I am not sure why, but they do, I think it creates more problems than it is worth personally. Why would someone put dye in with fish eggs? Does this affect the color of the fish when they mature, or what? And I don't think I will be able to resist peeking in on them every day, I can't wait for the first one to hatch, I am very excited about hatching these amazing little fish. According to the guy I bought them from, there are 15 Gardneri Akure, and 10 N'sukka. I only ordered 12 Akure, soI think he was pretty generous. I have the eggs in those little, I don't know what else to call them, but Salsa containers, lol. They are the cups that Salsa comes in from a Mexican food restaurant, they are kind of like 2 inches wide at the top, and maybe an inch tall, and have little plastic lids. I got them out of the vials they came in as soon as I could, I knew it was important that I do, plus, t!
he genius sent them in little vials, WITHOUT STOPPERS! I took one wrapping of the tap off, and they began to leak! He had just put a peice of duct tape over the top, and then wrapped it a few times. Seems like a bad idea to me, considering all tapes have glues on them! I am sure the chemicals in the glue aren't beneficial to the little eggs, although they may not be harmful. I have the eggs on the top shelf in my pantry, it's probably about 70 in there at night, and 75 in the day, maybe cooler, I'm not sure, I'm just guessing. And there is practically NO LIGHT, If I took all the shelves out(It's not the walk-in kind), and walked into it, I would not be able to navigate around.
  Scott Davis <unclescott at prodigy_net> wrote: Hi Chris!

Getting one's first eggs or killies through the mail is one of those neat
and nervous experiences that make life interesting. Ask any killinut about
their first eggs or fish in the mail. They probably remember it vividly
years afterwards. :)

The eggs should have been held a couple of days before they were sent. The
best approach with acriflavin, bamiflavin, acriflavin plus, or velvet guard
is to use a very lightly tinted solution only for a couple of days and then
completely change the water. Water changes (with water seasoned for a few
days) every couple of days for many embryos (they are metabolizing and
leaving waste materials after all) is good.

Most that were going to die and fungus should have so before they were sent.
A number of people will cover their bets by tossing a couple of extras in
just in case.

I seldom use any dye at all. Watch the eggs. If you take a peek daily, you
will any residual bad eggs turning white. Remove them with an eyedropper.
This is seldom a problem - checking them regularly - with your first batches
anyway. ;)

Wright has mentioned eggs being harder to hatch out of with use of the dyes.
Birth defects and malformed fry can also be blamed on too much of a dye
dose.

Although list members are not entirely in agreement on this, please incubate
the eggs in a low light area. Many feel that the rainforest killie eggs
(Aphyosemion, Scriptaphyosemion, Epiplatys, Fundulopanchax...) are light
sensitive. In this weather it may also keep them from getting too warm -
although they hatch a lot faster at 80 degrees F than at 70.

One last thing. If the eggs are still in the shipping container, get them
out. They can suffocate in there after some days. The winter danger of an
open incubation container evaporating isn't great this time of the year.

If you first fry hatches and has a little bit of a tummy, that is ok. Wait a
little before feeding or add a little "clean" aquarium water. (Greenwater is
useful, not necessary.) Start a small portion your baby brine shrimp if you
are going to use it. (Start another small b.s. culture the next day if you
can.) If a couple of fry have hatched by the next day (most people selling
eggs will try for a batch laid about the same time) you may wish to "force"
the rest of them. It is easier to raise fry all hatched about the same time.

The most common way of forcing or encouraging killie eggs to hatch is to
take a clean turkey baster (no fish keeper should be without one) and gently
squirt the unhatched eggs into a clean, well rinsed (soapLESS) medicine
bottle. Put it in your pocket - motion and body heat will often bounce them
out in minutes to a couple of hours. (My social studies students used to
know I was trying to force eggs when I actually wore a sport coat - each
pocket might have a medicine bottle of eggs.) Alternately take a drive and
leave them in the glove compartment (if it is not too hot).

One approach by (real) old timers was to put the eggs in a vial or dish with
a few micro worms. George Maier's old tag line that the fry would see the
food and try to get out and get it. Of course the CO2 given off by the worms
was probably more the cause of the egg chorion (outside) softening.

If you are carrying the eggs, they aren't too hot but aren't hatching, open
the vial and breath into it a time or two. A little CO2 from your breath may
accomplish the same thing as the microworms. (But be prepared for breath
jokes from the family.)

Let the water temperature equalize with what your are going to put them in.
A few small snails with fully hatched fry are a useful clean up crew. A wad
of Java moss, hornwort or water sprite is useful too. The plants will absorb
some waste material and the fry will browse a few rotifers and other
microscopic beasties off of the plants.

Good luck and welcome to killies!

All the best!

Scott


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