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Re: nitrate filter



Hi Erik,

I'm not Frank but I wrote what you quoted. I am not talking about the nitrate sponge. I'm talking about a product made of high void glass foam. Kent Marine calls it Cell-Pore and it was originally made by Cercona before Kent bought it. I have five of the thinner pieces buried just under the gravel in a 75 gallon tank above an under gravel filter. I have two of the 9 X 9 X 4 pieces in a 100 gallon indoor pond where they do double duty to hold plant pots. There is a water current from a powerhead flowing past, and one would expect, partly through them. I have one 9 X 9 X 4 and two 9 X 4 X 4 blocks in a 230 arranged over the intake grid of the tank filter. However there is plenty of un-occluded intake grid so any flow through the blocks must be slow. Eventually (years) the blocks clog and must be discarded or rejuvenated. They can be rejuvenated several times but eventually the "dry" weight of the block indicates clogged areas inside. To unclog them, simply hose them down, knocking out as much of the  contents as possible. Soak them several times in strong 6% or higher hydrogen peroxide. This will loosen up more debris that can be hosed out. You cannot put them in the oven or ceramic kiln and bake out the  mulm. You certainly cannot heat them up to glowing with a torch and burn out the clogging deposits. The glass would shatter treated that way. Pyrex it is not.
  
----- Original Message -----
From: Erik Pfingstner
Sent: Monday, July 22, 2002 1:28 PM
To: killietalk at aka_org
Subject: AW: nitrate filter
  
Hi Frank,

I was just in the web because the data you told below surprised me. I
believe what you call a denitrification block is what Kent calls their "Kent
Marine Nitrate Sponge". This is made up of Zeolith which is a material which
indeed will reduce Nitrates. Though it also reduces iron level and such in
the tank if used as filter medium.

By the way, I dont understand how such a block could significantly reduce
nitrates if burried under ground (unles you have an under ground filter or
heater. To work, it must be placed such as water slowly flows through it. I
dont expect it to reduce significantly nitrates or anything if it is burried
in the ground.

Zeolith is known to have such microscopic pores that alike coal, it will
remove almost anything in the water if used as filter medium. Additionally
to being very porous, it will chemically bind nitrates and phosphates.
Though here is the colliding data: In Germany, they advertize zeolith as
being an active absorber of these substances, binding them chemically but
which needs to be removed after a while to avoid the substances being
released again in the water. And Kent marine products advertise it as an
anerobic bacterial substrate.

Of course any porous material will retain bacteria, coal also will. But
zeolith should just as coal become cludged with stuff  slowing down very
quickly the water flow.

Have you yourself been using this "Kent Marine Nitrate Sponge" or block as
you call it? In what size of a tank and for how long?

Erik


> -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
> Von: owner-killietalk at aka_org [mailto:owner-killietalk at aka_org]Im
> Auftrag von Daniel McMonigle
> Gesendet: Montag, 22. Juli 2002 09:20
> An: killietalk at aka_org
> Betreff: Re: nitrate filter
>
>
> Go to a place that carries Kent Marine products and get a 9 X 9 X
> 4 inch denitrifying block. Partly bury in gravel if you like or
> leave it bare in the tank. No pumps or housing is necessary, but
> if you have a wet dry filter, the sump is an ideal place for it.
> After about two months the nitrate will begin to drop and then it
> permanently reaches zero. Removing the log jam of nitrate at the
> end ought logically to ease the transformation of ammonia to
> nitrite to nitrate, but I don't know that have been proven. The 9
> x 4 X 4 blocks work too, but since the active zone is deep
> inside, two of these smaller blocks don't equal one of the larger.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: YoHoHo at aol_com
> Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2002 8:54 PM
> To: KillieTalk at aka_org
> Subject: Re: nitrate filter
>
> How do you construct a nitrate filter??
>                  o
>             *
>              o
>            *
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> ~~~~~~~~~~<**)))><\~~~~~~~~~~~
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Frank Carriglitto
> ChiKA, AKA #08234
>
>
>
> > Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 02:21:11 +0200
> > From: "Erik Pfingstner" <erikpfingstner at freenet_de>
> > Subject: AW: changing water . . .
> >
> > Ha! Here you get some coliding data:
> >
> > I have been reading opinions in the oposite direction: change water the
> > less
> > possible! myself I am basically used to big tanks. For my 450
> Liters (120
> > Gal) tank I have constructed a nitrate filter. I had it run
> during nearly
> > one year and despite changing water very seldomly, I never could measure
> > any
> > nitrates at all. I never measured phosphates but having no
> algae at all, I
> > did not bother.
> >
> > The filter went untight some time ago and I constructed another
> one. I put
> > it in use on wensday and had 30 mg/l nitrates and 0.25 mg/l
> phosphates at
> > that time. I bet that in 4-6 weeks, I will have zero nitrates without
> > changing any water.
> >
>
>
>
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